Candidates

Washington - Physical Ability Test Requirements

NEW WASHINGTON STATE PAT STANDARDS IN EFFECT - JANUARY 1ST, 2021

Effective January 1st, 2021, the Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission (CJTC) has updated the PAT standards for entry into the Basic Law Enforcement Academy (BLEA) and Corrections Officer Academy (COA).

PST will ONLY offer the NEW 2021 PAT standards for Washington State candidates effective January 1st, 2021.

Candidates for the position of police officer/deputy sheriff/trooper must successfully complete the following Physical Ability Test (PAT) . The PAT administered by PST is the same test that is required for entrance into the Basic Law Enforcement Academy.

  • You must successfully complete the minimum number of correct repetitions for each individual PAT event.
  • You must successfully pass each event. Failing one event will constitute a failure of the PAT.
  • There are no "maximum scores" for the events.
Washington# of repetitions
Event #1 Push-Ups - 90 seconds 20
Event #2 Sit-Ups - 90 seconds 25
Event #3 Squat Thrusts - 3 minutes 35

If you do not pass your PAT, you are eligible to retest all events on another day. For agencies that required the PAT to recieve your test scores, your PAT must be successfully completed within 90 days from your written exam date. A PAT retest fee will apply.

You are highly encouraged to watch the below demonstration video PRIOR to taking the PAT.


Physical Ability Test

Events

Event #1 - 90 Second Push-Up Test

This test measures the muscular strength/endurance of the upper body muscles in the shoulders, chest, and back of the upper arms (the triceps) used in high intensity self defense and arrest simulation training. This is important for use of force involving pushing motion breaking one’s fall to the ground, use of the baton, etc.

Place your hands on the ground so they are in a vertical line with your shoulders, approximately 1 - 1.5 shoulder widths apart. Your feet may be together, or up to 12 inches apart. Your body must be in a straight line from the shoulders to the ankles, and must remain that way throughout the exercise. Lower your body by bending your elbows until your upper arms are parallel to the ground and you touch and slightly compress the 4-inch foam block held under your chest.

Return to the starting position by completely straightening your arms. You may only rest in the up position. If you fail to: keep your body in a straight line; touch your chest to the foam block; or lock your arms in the up position, you will receive a warning. After one warning, incorrect repetitions will not count.

You will have 90 seconds to successfully complete 20 push-ups. Your score is the total number of correct repetitions.

Event #2 - 90 Second Sit-Up Test

This test measures the muscular strength/endurance of the abdominal muscles, which are used in selfdefense and high intensity arrest-simulation training. Further these muscles are important for performing tasks that involve the use of force, and it helps maintain good posture and minimize lower back problems.

Lie on your back with your knees bent at 90 degrees or tighter with your heels on the edge of the mat. Your feet may be together or apart, but the heels must stay in contact with the floor. Your partner will sit on your feet and wrap their arms around your calf muscle area. It is your responsibility to inform your partner of any adjustments that need to be made in order to assure your comfort. Your fingers must stay interlocked behind your head throughout the event. If your little fingers are not touching, that is considered "apart" and such performance will not be counted. Lift your body by bending at the waist. Touch your elbows to your knees, and return to the starting position. When returning to the starting position, your fingers must touch the proctor's hand on the mat.

You may rest only in the up position. Do not arch your back or lift your buttocks from the mat. If you fail to: keep your fingers interlocked, touch your elbows to your knees or your fingers to the proctor's hand, or lift your buttocks off the mat, you will receive one warning. After one warning, incorrect repetitions will not count.

You will have 90 seconds to successfully complete 25 sit-ups. Your score is the total number of correct repetitions.

Event #3 - 3 Minute Squat Thrust Test

This test is used to gauge the ability to participate in the physical requirements expected during the Basic Law Enforcement Academy and Corrections Officer Academy Control and Defensive Tactics training.

Stand tall with your back straight, feet shoulder-width apart, arms lifted, and hands above your head. Push your hips back and bend your knees, squat down, and place your hands on the floor in front of you, shoulder-width apart. Keeping your hands in place, back flat, and core engaged, kick both feet back at the same time until your body is in the plank position: arms and body straight, knees locked, hands in line with and slightly wider than your shoulders, feet no wider than shoulder-width apart. Your hands must touch the ground before you kick your feet back into the plank position.

Reverse the sequence to return to the starting position. When bringing your feet back in, they may be either together or up to slightly wider than shoulder-width apart. You must stand tall, push your hips forward until your back is straight, and arms raised overhead before the repetition is counted. Lifting your gaze parallel with the ground is recommended, as it helps ensure you stand up straight. If your feet are wider than shoulder-width apart at this point, you must step them back together before beginning the next repetition.

You may rest in the standing position, with your arms up or down, but you must return to the correct starting position with hands overhead before resuming repetitions. If you fail to: kick both feet out or in at the same time, keep your body in a straight line in the plank position, or return to a straight standing position with hands raised above the head, you will receive one warning. After one warning, any incorrect repetitions will not count.

You will have 3 minutes to successfully complete 35 squat thrusts. This is a Pass/Fail event, so you may stop once you reach the required number of repetitions. Your score is the total number of correct repetitions.

Physical Ability Preparation and Conditioning

1. Conditioning Program for the Push-up Test

Determine exercise level by measuring how many pushups the subject can complete in 90 seconds.

When performing pushups, be sure the subject continues until muscular failure occurs in the straight-knee position and then continues until failure occurs in the bent-knee position.

  • If the total number is 15 or less, begin at level A.
  • If the subject's total number is greater than 15, begin at level B.

Subject should work toward reaching level C below.

  • Level A - 1 set 3 times a week for 1 week
  • Level B - 2 sets 3 times a week for 2 weeks
  • Level C - 3 sets 3 times a week until testing

2. Conditioning Program for the Sit-up Test

Determine exercise level by measuring how many sit-ups the subject can complete in 90 seconds.

  • If the subject's total number is 15 or less, begin at level A.
  • If the subject's total number is greater than 15, begin at level B.

Subject should work toward reaching level C below.

  • Level A - 1 set 3 times a week for 1 week
  • Level B - 2 sets 3 times a week for 2 weeks
  • Level C - 3 sets 3 times a week until testing

When training for sit-ups, be sure the subject continues until muscular failure occurs and then continues with his/her hands by the hips until muscular failure occurs again.

2. Conditioning Program for the Squat Thrust Test

Determine exercise level by measuring how many squat thrusts the subject can complete in 3 minutes.

  • If the subject's total number is 15 or less, begin at level A.
  • If the subject's total number is greater than 15, begin at level B.

Subject should work toward reaching level C below.

  • Level A - 1 set 3 times a week for 1 week
  • Level B - 2 sets 3 times a week for 2 weeks
  • Level C - 3 sets 3 times a week until testing

When training for squat thrusts, be sure the subject continues until muscular failure occurs and then continues with his/her hands by the hips until muscular failure occurs again.

Preparing For The Fitness Ability Test

The physical ability test is about the only “open book” part of the testing process – there is really no excuse for not being prepared! Proper preparation is critical. The Criminal Justice Training Commission offers advice/suggestion on preparing for the physical ability test. 

Before beginning a physical exercise program it is strongly recommended that you be cleared by a doctor to undertake such a program. Individuals 40 years of age or older should not begin a program until they have been cleared by a doctor.

Whereas many training routines can be used to improve performance in the Fitness Ability Test, participants should keep in mind that physical training is specific. That is, one improves in those activities that are practiced. If one wishes to optimize push-up performance, push-ups should be included in the training program. Many other exercises can also be included to strengthen the chest, shoulders and arms, but push-ups should be included in the routine.

Ideally, muscles and the cardiovascular system should be gradually and progressively trained over several weeks or months to achieve desired fitness gains. Physical adaptations occur gradually in response to regular, consistent overloads, i.e. doing more than your body is accustomed to doing.  It is important to bear in mind that every individual adapts at a different rate- a stimulus resulting in an appropriate, moderate overload to one person may be too much or too little for another person. A participant who has been inactive for a significant period of time should plan to take six to twelve weeks to train for the Fitness Ability Test.

The training routine should include exercises to train upper body strength and muscular endurance, abdominal muscular endurance, leg power, cardio-respiratory endurance and anaerobic power. Strength and cardio-respiratory endurance activities should be performed about every other day, or three days per week, to allow adequate recovery and positive adaptations to occur. Anaerobic (high intensity) training should be done once or twice per week, and can be performed in lieu of a cardio-respiratory training session. For flexibility enhancement, good back health, and injury prevention, stretching exercises should be performed before and especially after training sessions, as well as on days off.

The following program is progressive to allow the body time to adapt and build up. It is assumed that the applicant will begin this program at least 12 weeks in advance of the test date.

Delayed muscle soreness, 24-48 hours post exercise, may occur as a result of any new exercise program. This soreness should only be mild in nature and should dissipate prior to the next scheduled exercise session.

If significant or severe soreness exists, the subject exercised too hard and therefore should not perform any exercise, other than stretching, that stresses the affected area until all soreness has disappeared completely.

Remember that this program is designed to build a person up, not tear him/her down. Subjects should pay close attention to their body for any indication of injury or over-use.